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David Smuts | Death, Detention and Disappearance: A Lawyer's Battle to Hold Power to Account in 1980s Namibia :: Dartmouth College

d smutsThe Nelson A. Rockefeller Center and the Department of English and Creative Writing welcome Namibian Supreme Court Justice David Smuts to Dartmouth to discuss his new book, Death, Detention and Disappearance: A Lawyer’s Battle to Hold Power to Account in 1980’s Namibia.
 
The 1980s in Namibia were a decade full of human rights abuses by South African forces. Justice David Smuts' gripping memoir details several dramatic cases where it was proven torture was used to extract 'confessions' and that Koevoet (the counter-insurgency branch of the South West African Police) killed citizens. He also takes a look at the assassination of his close friend, SWAPO activist Anton Lubowski.
 
David Smuts is a founding director of Namibia's Legal Assistance Center. He helped found Namibia's first independent newspaper and defended numerous anti-apartheid and anti-occupation prisoners before Namibia became independent. He became a judge of the High Court before joining the Supreme Court as a justice. He has law degrees from Stellenbosch University and a LLM degree from Harvard. Smuts has contributed significantly to the development of human rights jurisprudence in Namibia and to the stature of it's highest court. 

Free and open to the public. The bookstore will be on hand with copies of Death, Detention and Disappearance for purchase and signing.

Event date: 
Monday, October 14, 2019 - 4:30pm
Event address: 
Dartmouth
003 Rockefeller
Hanover, NH
Death, Detention and Disappearance: A lawyer's battle to hold power to account in 1980s Namibia Cover Image
$23.00
ISBN: 9780624089865
Availability: Usually Available in 1-5 Days
Published: Tafelberg - August 16th, 2019

In Namibia, the 1980s were a decade of human rights abuses by South African forces. Justice David Smuts' gripping memoir details several dramatic cases where it was proven that torture was used to extract 'confessions' and that Koevoet killed citizens. He also takes a look at the assassination of his close friend, SWAPO activist Anton Lubowski.