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Manisha Sinha :: VHC 1st Wednesday Lecture

antislavery newsThe Norwich Bookstore is proud to partner with the Norwich Public Library and the Vermont Humanities Council for 1st Wednesday Lecture Series. We will be providing books for several of the gatherings.

November 1st Wednesday: The Antislavery Press and the Road to Civil War

University of Connecticut history professor Manisha Sinha explores the work and legacy of antislavery editors such as William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Martin Delaney, whose journalism in the mid-19th century was critical to the abolition of slavery.

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Manisha Sinha is the author of The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition, that illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave's cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe. 

Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. 

Free & open to the public.

This lecture underwritten by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in partnership with Pulitzer Prizes.
 

Event date: 
Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - 7:00pm
Event address: 
Norwich Congregational Church
15 Church Street
Norwich, VT
The Slave's Cause: A History of Abolition Cover Image
$25.00
ISBN: 9780300227116
Availability: On Our Shelves Now (call or email to confirm availability)
Published: Yale University Press - February 21st, 2017

Winner of the 2017 Frederick Douglass Prize

A groundbreaking history of abolition that recovers the largely forgotten role of African Americans in the long march toward emancipation from the American Revolution through the Civil War


Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic con