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Nora Krug | On Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home :: In Conversation with Jason Lutes :: Dartmouth -- CANCELLED / MOVED ONLINE

krug book in germanCancelled - on-line event only
Graphic artist, Nora Krug, will speak with Jason Lutes about her book Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home. (Heimat is the German title.) Both award-winning authors, they have each delved into the world of WWII Germany though from different vantage points. 

Born in Germany, Nora returned to explore the shadow the Nazi regime cast on culture and family. Her extraordinary quest, spanning continents and generations, pieces together her family’s troubling story and reflects on what it means to be a German of her generation.

Jason is the author of Berlin, an intricate look at the fall of the Weimar Republic through the eyes of its citizens, first published as a serial and now bound into a 580 page book.

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Free and open to the public, this event is sponsored by the Leslie Center for Humanities, The Will and Ann Eisner Family Foundation, and the Center for Cartoon Studies. The Norwich Bookstore has books in stock.

Event date: 
Thursday, April 16, 2020 - 5:00pm
Event address: 
01 Rockefeller Hall
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH
Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home Cover Image
$20.00
ISBN: 9781476796635
Availability: On Our Shelves Now (email to confirm availability)
Published: Scribner - September 17th, 2019

* Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award * Silver Medal Society of Illustrators *

* Named a Best Book of the Year by The New York Times, The Boston Globe, San Francisco Chronicle, NPR, Comics Beat, The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Kirkus Reviews, and Library Journal

This “ingenious reck


Berlin Cover Image
$49.95
ISBN: 9781770463264
Availability: On Our Shelves Now (email to confirm availability)
Published: Drawn and Quarterly - September 4th, 2018

Best of 2018 nods from the Washington Post, New York Public Library, Globe and Mail, the Guardian, and more!

"The magic in Berlin is in the way Lutes conjures, out of old newspapers and photographs, a city so remote from him in time and space... [Berlin has] an ending so electrifying that I gasped."—New York Times Book Review