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Tim Traver | Lost in the Driftless: Trout Fishing on the Cultural Divide

Trtim traverout Fishing in the Age of Trump — exploring the urban/rural divide with a fly rod.

Trout fishing in Wisconsin's Driftless Area opens a small window into the growing urban/rural divide in America. The politics of rural resentment is arguably what got  Scott Walker (a Tea Party governor elected on a recall vote) and Trump elected thanks to the voters from rural Wisconsin and Michigan counties  who showed up at the polls (and the urban voters from Madison, Milwaukee and other urban areas who did not). 

The Driftless Area in rural southwestern Wisconsin has some of the most productive spring creeks in the world. ​Author Tim Traver goes fishing with a local self-described "trout regs protester," to look at the social and biological impacts of special regulations designed to promote and protect this fishery as a destination for out of state traveling fly fishers and local anglers alike.

The reading and discussion will focus as much on the politics of rural resentment as on trout fishing.

NOTE  6 pm start time!

Free and open to the public. Reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat. 

Event date: 
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 6:00pm
Event address: 
291 Main St
Norwich, VT
Lost in the Driftless: Trout Fishing on the Cultural Divide Cover Image
$19.95
ISBN: 9780692756164
Availability: On Our Shelves Now (call or email to confirm availability)
Published: Timothy Traver - March 1st, 2017

The Driftless Area in rural southwestern Wisconsin has some of the most productive spring creeks in the world. Brown trout numbers can reach 5000 catchable fish per mile in creeks only 10 meters wide.


Sippewissett: Or, Life on a Salt Marsh Cover Image
By Tim Traver, Bobbi Angell (Illustrator)
Email or call for price
ISBN: 9781933392783
Availability: Out of Print (call or email to check availability of used copies)
Published: Chelsea Green Publishing Company - March 12th, 2008

Tim Traver's Sippewissett is heir to a rich history of nature writing. Akin to classics like Aldo Leopold's A Sand County Almanac and Annie Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, the book forms an eloquent bridge between ecology and memory, science and art.